Mark Boxer and his Hoonda

Fight Club

Fight Club

Take a sportbike, subtract fairings, add insanity.

That’s a streetfighter and it’s unfortunately the most underrated custom in the states. To help rectify this issue. Here’s the lowdown from MARK BOXER on his custom turbo Honda 900RR built by Extreme Creations in Australia.

So, turbo 900RR.

What’s the first thought when you dump throttle?

Well to be honest I’ve been lucky enough to ride a handful of other turbo bikes before, so I’ve experienced the “sensation”, but with the Hoonda as it’s currently only running 3psi boost, so it’s actually quite tame to ride until you wind it out. As soon as I can get it on a dyno though it’ll get the 7psi gate spring fitted and then I’m sure it’ll be much more of an eye opener!

What is the story behind the gas mask headlight for all street fighters?

I’m no real fighter historian, but I’d say somewhere along the lines someone has popped the lenses out of an old gas mask and mounted it on their bike just to do something a bit different. I’m not too sure what the inspiration was for the guys from Showyo Moto to build their mask headlights, but never the less they do an amazing job and the finished product comes ready for paint.

Why should people build a fighter?

I think bike enthusiasts should build at least one fighter in their time because they’re the sort of bike where you can spend very little to achieve quite a bold aesthetic statement. And with that in mind even though many are similar, a few small changes here and there, a personalized paint job and giving it a name makes it a one-of-a-kind. When I built Bladerod (www.bladerod.com) I had limited budget, nowhere to build it, and just a head full of ideas, so it goes to show that if you’re resourceful it’s not hard to build a cool bike.

Australian riding culture. What separates it from the rest of the world?

I don’t thing much separates us, just a lot of water, but I guess one thing I’ve noticed in recent years with street bikes compared to other places I’ve visited is there almost seems to be a reluctancy for people to own “older” bikes. Most places you go the bikes are no older than 10 years which makes me a little sad to think that people are really missing out on the awesome bikes of years gone by. Yet having said that for a guy like me who is a complete and utter 98 Fireblade fan boy, it means bikes and parts are getting cheaper.

What’s your least favorite part of the bike?

I don’t thing much separates us, just a lot of water, but I guess one thing I’ve noticed in recent years with street bikes compared to other places I’ve visited is there almost seems to be a reluctancy for people to own “older” bikes. Most places you go the bikes are no older than 10 years which makes me a little sad to think that people are really missing out on the awesome bikes of years gone by. Yet having said that for a guy like me who is a complete and utter 98 Fireblade fan boy, it means bikes and parts are getting cheaper.